Eating for Longevity

Heart Health

Heart disease accounts for almost one-third of deaths globally. Diet plays a significant role in heart health and may affect your chance of cardiovascular disease. In reality, certain foods may affect blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides levels and inflammation, all which are risk factors for heart disease. Listed below are foods which you should be eating to optimize your cardiovascular wellness.

Leafy green

vegetables such as spinach, kale, and collard greens are well known because of their abundance of vitamins, antioxidants, and minerals. Specifically, they are a wonderful source of vitamin K, which will help safeguard your arteries and promote proper blood flow.

Berries


Strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries are full of antioxidants. Studies indicate that eating them is able to reduce several risk factors for heart disease.

Avocados

Avocados are high in monounsaturated fats as well as potassium. They may help decrease your cholesterol, blood pressure and risk of metabolic syndrome.

Fatty Fish and Fish Oil

Fatty fish and fish oil are equally high in omega-3 fatty acids and may decrease heart disease risk factors, including blood pressure, triglycerides, and cholesterol.


Walnuts

Walnuts are a Terrific source of fiber and micronutrients like magnesium. Magnesium and manganese Studies recommend that walnuts can decrease cholesterol and blood pressure and could be related to a lesser risk of cardiovascular disease.


Beans

Beans are high in resistant carbohydrates and also have been proven to reduce rates of cholesterol and cholesterol, reduced blood pressure and lessen inflammation.

Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate is high in antioxidants such as flavonoids. It’s been associated with a lesser chance of creating calcified plaque from the blood vessels and coronary heart disease. if you can find 75-80% cocoa Dark Chocolate in the store buy it.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are full of lycopene and also have been correlated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, in addition to an increase in”good” HDL cholesterol.